Merge branch 'next' of git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/joro/iommu
[~shefty/rdma-dev.git] / tools / testing / ktest / sample.conf
1 #
2 # Config file for ktest.pl
3 #
4 # Note, all paths must be absolute
5 #
6
7 # Options set in the beginning of the file are considered to be
8 # default options. These options can be overriden by test specific
9 # options, with the following exceptions:
10 #
11 #  LOG_FILE
12 #  CLEAR_LOG
13 #  POWEROFF_ON_SUCCESS
14 #  REBOOT_ON_SUCCESS
15 #
16 # Test specific options are set after the label:
17 #
18 # TEST_START
19 #
20 # The options after a TEST_START label are specific to that test.
21 # Each TEST_START label will set up a new test. If you want to
22 # perform a test more than once, you can add the ITERATE label
23 # to it followed by the number of times you want that test
24 # to iterate. If the ITERATE is left off, the test will only
25 # be performed once.
26 #
27 # TEST_START ITERATE 10
28 #
29 # You can skip a test by adding SKIP (before or after the ITERATE
30 # and number)
31 #
32 # TEST_START SKIP
33 #
34 # TEST_START SKIP ITERATE 10
35 #
36 # TEST_START ITERATE 10 SKIP
37 #
38 # The SKIP label causes the options and the test itself to be ignored.
39 # This is useful to set up several different tests in one config file, and
40 # only enabling the ones you want to use for a current test run.
41 #
42 # You can add default options anywhere in the file as well
43 # with the DEFAULTS tag. This allows you to have default options
44 # after the test options to keep the test options at the top
45 # of the file. You can even place the DEFAULTS tag between
46 # test cases (but not in the middle of a single test case)
47 #
48 # TEST_START
49 # MIN_CONFIG = /home/test/config-test1
50 #
51 # DEFAULTS
52 # MIN_CONFIG = /home/test/config-default
53 #
54 # TEST_START ITERATE 10
55 #
56 # The above will run the first test with MIN_CONFIG set to
57 # /home/test/config-test-1. Then 10 tests will be executed
58 # with MIN_CONFIG with /home/test/config-default.
59 #
60 # You can also disable defaults with the SKIP option
61 #
62 # DEFAULTS SKIP
63 # MIN_CONFIG = /home/test/config-use-sometimes
64 #
65 # DEFAULTS
66 # MIN_CONFIG = /home/test/config-most-times
67 #
68 # The above will ignore the first MIN_CONFIG. If you want to
69 # use the first MIN_CONFIG, remove the SKIP from the first
70 # DEFAULTS tag and add it to the second. Be careful, options
71 # may only be declared once per test or default. If you have
72 # the same option name under the same test or as default
73 # ktest will fail to execute, and no tests will run.
74 #
75 # DEFAULTS OVERRIDE
76 #
77 # Options defined in the DEFAULTS section can not be duplicated
78 # even if they are defined in two different DEFAULT sections.
79 # This is done to catch mistakes where an option is added but
80 # the previous option was forgotten about and not commented.
81 #
82 # The OVERRIDE keyword can be added to a section to allow this
83 # section to override other DEFAULT sections values that have
84 # been defined previously. It will only override options that
85 # have been defined before its use. Options defined later
86 # in a non override section will still error. The same option
87 # can not be defined in the same section even if that section
88 # is marked OVERRIDE.
89 #
90 #
91 #
92 # Both TEST_START and DEFAULTS sections can also have the IF keyword
93 # The value after the IF must evaluate into a 0 or non 0 positive
94 # integer, and can use the config variables (explained below).
95 #
96 # DEFAULTS IF ${IS_X86_32}
97 #
98 # The above will process the DEFAULTS section if the config
99 # variable IS_X86_32 evaluates to a non zero positive integer
100 # otherwise if it evaluates to zero, it will act the same
101 # as if the SKIP keyword was used.
102 #
103 # The ELSE keyword can be used directly after a section with
104 # a IF statement.
105 #
106 # TEST_START IF ${RUN_NET_TESTS}
107 # BUILD_TYPE = useconfig:${CONFIG_DIR}/config-network
108 #
109 # ELSE
110 #
111 # BUILD_TYPE = useconfig:${CONFIG_DIR}/config-normal
112 #
113 #
114 # The ELSE keyword can also contain an IF statement to allow multiple
115 # if then else sections. But all the sections must be either
116 # DEFAULT or TEST_START, they can not be a mixture.
117 #
118 # TEST_START IF ${RUN_NET_TESTS}
119 # BUILD_TYPE = useconfig:${CONFIG_DIR}/config-network
120 #
121 # ELSE IF ${RUN_DISK_TESTS}
122 # BUILD_TYPE = useconfig:${CONFIG_DIR}/config-tests
123 #
124 # ELSE IF ${RUN_CPU_TESTS}
125 # BUILD_TYPE = useconfig:${CONFIG_DIR}/config-cpu
126 #
127 # ELSE
128 # BUILD_TYPE = useconfig:${CONFIG_DIR}/config-network
129 #
130 # The if statement may also have comparisons that will and for
131 # == and !=, strings may be used for both sides.
132 #
133 # BOX_TYPE := x86_32
134 #
135 # DEFAULTS IF ${BOX_TYPE} == x86_32
136 # BUILD_TYPE = useconfig:${CONFIG_DIR}/config-32
137 # ELSE
138 # BUILD_TYPE = useconfig:${CONFIG_DIR}/config-64
139 #
140 # The DEFINED keyword can be used by the IF statements too.
141 # It returns true if the given config variable or option has been defined
142 # or false otherwise.
143 #
144
145 # DEFAULTS IF DEFINED USE_CC
146 # CC := ${USE_CC}
147 # ELSE
148 # CC := gcc
149 #
150 #
151 # As well as NOT DEFINED.
152 #
153 # DEFAULTS IF NOT DEFINED MAKE_CMD
154 # MAKE_CMD := make ARCH=x86
155 #
156 #
157 # And/or ops (&&,||) may also be used to make complex conditionals.
158 #
159 # TEST_START IF (DEFINED ALL_TESTS || ${MYTEST} == boottest) && ${MACHINE} == gandalf
160 #
161 # Notice the use of paranthesis. Without any paranthesis the above would be
162 # processed the same as:
163 #
164 # TEST_START IF DEFINED ALL_TESTS || (${MYTEST} == boottest && ${MACHINE} == gandalf)
165 #
166 #
167 #
168 # INCLUDE file
169 #
170 # The INCLUDE keyword may be used in DEFAULT sections. This will
171 # read another config file and process that file as well. The included
172 # file can include other files, add new test cases or default
173 # statements. Config variables will be passed to these files and changes
174 # to config variables will be seen by top level config files. Including
175 # a file is processed just like the contents of the file was cut and pasted
176 # into the top level file, except, that include files that end with
177 # TEST_START sections will have that section ended at the end of
178 # the include file. That is, an included file is included followed
179 # by another DEFAULT keyword.
180 #
181 # Unlike other files referenced in this config, the file path does not need
182 # to be absolute. If the file does not start with '/', then the directory
183 # that the current config file was located in is used. If no config by the
184 # given name is found there, then the current directory is searched.
185 #
186 # INCLUDE myfile
187 # DEFAULT
188 #
189 # is the same as:
190 #
191 # INCLUDE myfile
192 #
193 # Note, if the include file does not contain a full path, the file is
194 # searched first by the location of the original include file, and then
195 # by the location that ktest.pl was executed in.
196 #
197
198 #### Config variables ####
199 #
200 # This config file can also contain "config variables".
201 # These are assigned with ":=" instead of the ktest option
202 # assigment "=".
203 #
204 # The difference between ktest options and config variables
205 # is that config variables can be used multiple times,
206 # where each instance will override the previous instance.
207 # And that they only live at time of processing this config.
208 #
209 # The advantage to config variables are that they can be used
210 # by any option or any other config variables to define thing
211 # that you may use over and over again in the options.
212 #
213 # For example:
214 #
215 # USER      := root
216 # TARGET    := mybox
217 # TEST_CASE := ssh ${USER}@${TARGET} /path/to/my/test
218 #
219 # TEST_START
220 # MIN_CONFIG = config1
221 # TEST = ${TEST_CASE}
222 #
223 # TEST_START
224 # MIN_CONFIG = config2
225 # TEST = ${TEST_CASE}
226 #
227 # TEST_CASE := ssh ${USER}@${TARGET} /path/to/my/test2
228 #
229 # TEST_START
230 # MIN_CONFIG = config1
231 # TEST = ${TEST_CASE}
232 #
233 # TEST_START
234 # MIN_CONFIG = config2
235 # TEST = ${TEST_CASE}
236 #
237 # TEST_DIR := /home/me/test
238 #
239 # BUILD_DIR = ${TEST_DIR}/linux.git
240 # OUTPUT_DIR = ${TEST_DIR}/test
241 #
242 # Note, the config variables are evaluated immediately, thus
243 # updating TARGET after TEST_CASE has been assigned does nothing
244 # to TEST_CASE.
245 #
246 # As shown in the example, to evaluate a config variable, you
247 # use the ${X} convention. Simple $X will not work.
248 #
249 # If the config variable does not exist, the ${X} will not
250 # be evaluated. Thus:
251 #
252 # MAKE_CMD = PATH=/mypath:${PATH} make
253 #
254 # If PATH is not a config variable, then the ${PATH} in
255 # the MAKE_CMD option will be evaluated by the shell when
256 # the MAKE_CMD option is passed into shell processing.
257
258 #### Using options in other options ####
259 #
260 # Options that are defined in the config file may also be used
261 # by other options. All options are evaulated at time of
262 # use (except that config variables are evaluated at config
263 # processing time).
264 #
265 # If an ktest option is used within another option, instead of
266 # typing it again in that option you can simply use the option
267 # just like you can config variables.
268 #
269 # MACHINE = mybox
270 #
271 # TEST = ssh root@${MACHINE} /path/to/test
272 #
273 # The option will be used per test case. Thus:
274 #
275 # TEST_TYPE = test
276 # TEST = ssh root@{MACHINE}
277 #
278 # TEST_START
279 # MACHINE = box1
280 #
281 # TEST_START
282 # MACHINE = box2
283 #
284 # For both test cases, MACHINE will be evaluated at the time
285 # of the test case. The first test will run ssh root@box1
286 # and the second will run ssh root@box2.
287
288 #### Mandatory Default Options ####
289
290 # These options must be in the default section, although most
291 # may be overridden by test options.
292
293 # The machine hostname that you will test
294 #MACHINE = target
295
296 # The box is expected to have ssh on normal bootup, provide the user
297 #  (most likely root, since you need privileged operations)
298 #SSH_USER = root
299
300 # The directory that contains the Linux source code
301 #BUILD_DIR = /home/test/linux.git
302
303 # The directory that the objects will be built
304 # (can not be same as BUILD_DIR)
305 #OUTPUT_DIR = /home/test/build/target
306
307 # The location of the compiled file to copy to the target
308 # (relative to OUTPUT_DIR)
309 #BUILD_TARGET = arch/x86/boot/bzImage
310
311 # The place to put your image on the test machine
312 #TARGET_IMAGE = /boot/vmlinuz-test
313
314 # A script or command to reboot the box
315 #
316 # Here is a digital loggers power switch example
317 #POWER_CYCLE = wget --no-proxy -O /dev/null -q  --auth-no-challenge 'http://admin:admin@power/outlet?5=CCL'
318 #
319 # Here is an example to reboot a virtual box on the current host
320 # with the name "Guest".
321 #POWER_CYCLE = virsh destroy Guest; sleep 5; virsh start Guest
322
323 # The script or command that reads the console
324 #
325 #  If you use ttywatch server, something like the following would work.
326 #CONSOLE = nc -d localhost 3001
327 #
328 # For a virtual machine with guest name "Guest".
329 #CONSOLE =  virsh console Guest
330
331 # Required version ending to differentiate the test
332 # from other linux builds on the system.
333 #LOCALVERSION = -test
334
335 # The grub title name for the test kernel to boot
336 # (Only mandatory if REBOOT_TYPE = grub)
337 #
338 # Note, ktest.pl will not update the grub menu.lst, you need to
339 # manually add an option for the test. ktest.pl will search
340 # the grub menu.lst for this option to find what kernel to
341 # reboot into.
342 #
343 # For example, if in the /boot/grub/menu.lst the test kernel title has:
344 # title Test Kernel
345 # kernel vmlinuz-test
346 #GRUB_MENU = Test Kernel
347
348 # A script to reboot the target into the test kernel
349 # (Only mandatory if REBOOT_TYPE = script)
350 #REBOOT_SCRIPT =
351
352 #### Optional Config Options (all have defaults) ####
353
354 # Start a test setup. If you leave this off, all options
355 # will be default and the test will run once.
356 # This is a label and not really an option (it takes no value).
357 # You can append ITERATE and a number after it to iterate the
358 # test a number of times, or SKIP to ignore this test.
359 #
360 #TEST_START
361 #TEST_START ITERATE 5
362 #TEST_START SKIP
363
364 # Have the following options as default again. Used after tests
365 # have already been defined by TEST_START. Optionally, you can
366 # just define all default options before the first TEST_START
367 # and you do not need this option.
368 #
369 # This is a label and not really an option (it takes no value).
370 # You can append SKIP to this label and the options within this
371 # section will be ignored.
372 #
373 # DEFAULTS
374 # DEFAULTS SKIP
375
376 # The default test type (default test)
377 # The test types may be:
378 #   build   - only build the kernel, do nothing else
379 #   install - build and install, but do nothing else (does not reboot)
380 #   boot    - build, install, and boot the kernel
381 #   test    - build, boot and if TEST is set, run the test script
382 #          (If TEST is not set, it defaults back to boot)
383 #   bisect - Perform a bisect on the kernel (see BISECT_TYPE below)
384 #   patchcheck - Do a test on a series of commits in git (see PATCHCHECK below)
385 #TEST_TYPE = test
386
387 # Test to run if there is a successful boot and TEST_TYPE is test.
388 # Must exit with 0 on success and non zero on error
389 # default (undefined)
390 #TEST = ssh user@machine /root/run_test
391
392 # The build type is any make config type or special command
393 #  (default randconfig)
394 #   nobuild - skip the clean and build step
395 #   useconfig:/path/to/config - use the given config and run
396 #              oldconfig on it.
397 # This option is ignored if TEST_TYPE is patchcheck or bisect
398 #BUILD_TYPE = randconfig
399
400 # The make command (default make)
401 # If you are building a 32bit x86 on a 64 bit host
402 #MAKE_CMD = CC=i386-gcc AS=i386-as make ARCH=i386
403
404 # Any build options for the make of the kernel (not for other makes, like configs)
405 # (default "")
406 #BUILD_OPTIONS = -j20
407
408 # If you need an initrd, you can add a script or code here to install
409 # it. The environment variable KERNEL_VERSION will be set to the
410 # kernel version that is used. Remember to add the initrd line
411 # to your grub menu.lst file.
412 #
413 # Here's a couple of examples to use:
414 #POST_INSTALL = ssh user@target /sbin/mkinitrd --allow-missing -f /boot/initramfs-test.img $KERNEL_VERSION
415 #
416 # or on some systems:
417 #POST_INSTALL = ssh user@target /sbin/dracut -f /boot/initramfs-test.img $KERNEL_VERSION
418
419 # If for some reason you just want to boot the kernel and you do not
420 # want the test to install anything new. For example, you may just want
421 # to boot test the same kernel over and over and do not want to go through
422 # the hassle of installing anything, you can set this option to 1
423 # (default 0)
424 #NO_INSTALL = 1
425
426 # If there is a script that you require to run before the build is done
427 # you can specify it with PRE_BUILD.
428 #
429 # One example may be if you must add a temporary patch to the build to
430 # fix a unrelated bug to perform a patchcheck test. This will apply the
431 # patch before each build that is made. Use the POST_BUILD to do a git reset --hard
432 # to remove the patch.
433 #
434 # (default undef)
435 #PRE_BUILD = cd ${BUILD_DIR} && patch -p1 < /tmp/temp.patch
436
437 # To specify if the test should fail if the PRE_BUILD fails,
438 # PRE_BUILD_DIE needs to be set to 1. Otherwise the PRE_BUILD
439 # result is ignored.
440 # (default 0)
441 # PRE_BUILD_DIE = 1
442
443 # If there is a script that should run after the build is done
444 # you can specify it with POST_BUILD.
445 #
446 # As the example in PRE_BUILD, POST_BUILD can be used to reset modifications
447 # made by the PRE_BUILD.
448 #
449 # (default undef)
450 #POST_BUILD = cd ${BUILD_DIR} && git reset --hard
451
452 # To specify if the test should fail if the POST_BUILD fails,
453 # POST_BUILD_DIE needs to be set to 1. Otherwise the POST_BUILD
454 # result is ignored.
455 # (default 0)
456 #POST_BUILD_DIE = 1
457
458 # Way to reboot the box to the test kernel.
459 # Only valid options so far are "grub" and "script"
460 # (default grub)
461 # If you specify grub, it will assume grub version 1
462 # and will search in /boot/grub/menu.lst for the title $GRUB_MENU
463 # and select that target to reboot to the kernel. If this is not
464 # your setup, then specify "script" and have a command or script
465 # specified in REBOOT_SCRIPT to boot to the target.
466 #
467 # The entry in /boot/grub/menu.lst must be entered in manually.
468 # The test will not modify that file.
469 #REBOOT_TYPE = grub
470
471 # The min config that is needed to build for the machine
472 # A nice way to create this is with the following:
473 #
474 #   $ ssh target
475 #   $ lsmod > mymods
476 #   $ scp mymods host:/tmp
477 #   $ exit
478 #   $ cd linux.git
479 #   $ rm .config
480 #   $ make LSMOD=mymods localyesconfig
481 #   $ grep '^CONFIG' .config > /home/test/config-min
482 #
483 # If you want even less configs:
484 #
485 #   log in directly to target (do not ssh)
486 #
487 #   $ su
488 #   # lsmod | cut -d' ' -f1 | xargs rmmod
489 #
490 #   repeat the above several times
491 #
492 #   # lsmod > mymods
493 #   # reboot
494 #
495 # May need to reboot to get your network back to copy the mymods
496 # to the host, and then remove the previous .config and run the
497 # localyesconfig again. The CONFIG_MIN generated like this will
498 # not guarantee network activity to the box so the TEST_TYPE of
499 # test may fail.
500 #
501 # You might also want to set:
502 #   CONFIG_CMDLINE="<your options here>"
503 #  randconfig may set the above and override your real command
504 #  line options.
505 # (default undefined)
506 #MIN_CONFIG = /home/test/config-min
507
508 # Sometimes there's options that just break the boot and
509 # you do not care about. Here are a few:
510 #   # CONFIG_STAGING is not set
511 #  Staging drivers are horrible, and can break the build.
512 #   # CONFIG_SCSI_DEBUG is not set
513 #  SCSI_DEBUG may change your root partition
514 #   # CONFIG_KGDB_SERIAL_CONSOLE is not set
515 #  KGDB may cause oops waiting for a connection that's not there.
516 # This option points to the file containing config options that will be prepended
517 # to the MIN_CONFIG (or be the MIN_CONFIG if it is not set)
518 #
519 # Note, config options in MIN_CONFIG will override these options.
520 #
521 # (default undefined)
522 #ADD_CONFIG = /home/test/config-broken
523
524 # The location on the host where to write temp files
525 # (default /tmp/ktest/${MACHINE})
526 #TMP_DIR = /tmp/ktest/${MACHINE}
527
528 # Optional log file to write the status (recommended)
529 #  Note, this is a DEFAULT section only option.
530 # (default undefined)
531 #LOG_FILE = /home/test/logfiles/target.log
532
533 # Remove old logfile if it exists before starting all tests.
534 #  Note, this is a DEFAULT section only option.
535 # (default 0)
536 #CLEAR_LOG = 0
537
538 # Line to define a successful boot up in console output.
539 # This is what the line contains, not the entire line. If you need
540 # the entire line to match, then use regural expression syntax like:
541 #  (do not add any quotes around it)
542 #
543 #  SUCCESS_LINE = ^MyBox Login:$
544 #
545 # (default "login:")
546 #SUCCESS_LINE = login:
547
548 # To speed up between reboots, defining a line that the
549 # default kernel produces that represents that the default
550 # kernel has successfully booted and can be used to pass
551 # a new test kernel to it. Otherwise ktest.pl will wait till
552 # SLEEP_TIME to continue.
553 # (default undefined)
554 #REBOOT_SUCCESS_LINE = login:
555
556 # In case the console constantly fills the screen, having
557 # a specified time to stop the test after success is recommended.
558 # (in seconds)
559 # (default 10)
560 #STOP_AFTER_SUCCESS = 10
561
562 # In case the console constantly fills the screen, having
563 # a specified time to stop the test after failure is recommended.
564 # (in seconds)
565 # (default 60)
566 #STOP_AFTER_FAILURE = 60
567
568 # In case the console constantly fills the screen, having
569 # a specified time to stop the test if it never succeeds nor fails
570 # is recommended.
571 # Note: this is ignored if a success or failure is detected.
572 # (in seconds)
573 # (default 600, -1 is to never stop)
574 #STOP_TEST_AFTER = 600
575
576 # Stop testing if a build fails. If set, the script will end if
577 # a failure is detected, otherwise it will save off the .config,
578 # dmesg and bootlog in a directory called
579 # MACHINE-TEST_TYPE_BUILD_TYPE-fail-yyyymmddhhmmss
580 # if the STORE_FAILURES directory is set.
581 # (default 1)
582 # Note, even if this is set to zero, there are some errors that still
583 # stop the tests.
584 #DIE_ON_FAILURE = 1
585
586 # Directory to store failure directories on failure. If this is not
587 # set, DIE_ON_FAILURE=0 will not save off the .config, dmesg and
588 # bootlog. This option is ignored if DIE_ON_FAILURE is not set.
589 # (default undefined)
590 #STORE_FAILURES = /home/test/failures
591
592 # Build without doing a make mrproper, or removing .config
593 # (default 0)
594 #BUILD_NOCLEAN = 0
595
596 # As the test reads the console, after it hits the SUCCESS_LINE
597 # the time it waits for the monitor to settle down between reads
598 # can usually be lowered.
599 # (in seconds) (default 1)
600 #BOOTED_TIMEOUT = 1
601
602 # The timeout in seconds when we consider the box hung after
603 # the console stop producing output. Be sure to leave enough
604 # time here to get pass a reboot. Some machines may not produce
605 # any console output for a long time during a reboot. You do
606 # not want the test to fail just because the system was in
607 # the process of rebooting to the test kernel.
608 # (default 120)
609 #TIMEOUT = 120
610
611 # In between tests, a reboot of the box may occur, and this
612 # is the time to wait for the console after it stops producing
613 # output. Some machines may not produce a large lag on reboot
614 # so this should accommodate it.
615 # The difference between this and TIMEOUT, is that TIMEOUT happens
616 # when rebooting to the test kernel. This sleep time happens
617 # after a test has completed and we are about to start running
618 # another test. If a reboot to the reliable kernel happens,
619 # we wait SLEEP_TIME for the console to stop producing output
620 # before starting the next test.
621 #
622 # You can speed up reboot times even more by setting REBOOT_SUCCESS_LINE.
623 # (default 60)
624 #SLEEP_TIME = 60
625
626 # The time in between bisects to sleep (in seconds)
627 # (default 60)
628 #BISECT_SLEEP_TIME = 60
629
630 # The time in between patch checks to sleep (in seconds)
631 # (default 60)
632 #PATCHCHECK_SLEEP_TIME = 60
633
634 # Reboot the target box on error (default 0)
635 #REBOOT_ON_ERROR = 0
636
637 # Power off the target on error (ignored if REBOOT_ON_ERROR is set)
638 #  Note, this is a DEFAULT section only option.
639 # (default 0)
640 #POWEROFF_ON_ERROR = 0
641
642 # Power off the target after all tests have completed successfully
643 #  Note, this is a DEFAULT section only option.
644 # (default 0)
645 #POWEROFF_ON_SUCCESS = 0
646
647 # Reboot the target after all test completed successfully (default 1)
648 # (ignored if POWEROFF_ON_SUCCESS is set)
649 #REBOOT_ON_SUCCESS = 1
650
651 # In case there are isses with rebooting, you can specify this
652 # to always powercycle after this amount of time after calling
653 # reboot.
654 # Note, POWERCYCLE_AFTER_REBOOT = 0 does NOT disable it. It just
655 # makes it powercycle immediately after rebooting. Do not define
656 # it if you do not want it.
657 # (default undefined)
658 #POWERCYCLE_AFTER_REBOOT = 5
659
660 # In case there's isses with halting, you can specify this
661 # to always poweroff after this amount of time after calling
662 # halt.
663 # Note, POWEROFF_AFTER_HALT = 0 does NOT disable it. It just
664 # makes it poweroff immediately after halting. Do not define
665 # it if you do not want it.
666 # (default undefined)
667 #POWEROFF_AFTER_HALT = 20
668
669 # A script or command to power off the box (default undefined)
670 # Needed for POWEROFF_ON_ERROR and SUCCESS
671 #
672 # Example for digital loggers power switch:
673 #POWER_OFF = wget --no-proxy -O /dev/null -q  --auth-no-challenge 'http://admin:admin@power/outlet?5=OFF'
674 #
675 # Example for a virtual guest call "Guest".
676 #POWER_OFF = virsh destroy Guest
677
678 # The way to execute a command on the target
679 # (default ssh $SSH_USER@$MACHINE $SSH_COMMAND";)
680 # The variables SSH_USER, MACHINE and SSH_COMMAND are defined
681 #SSH_EXEC = ssh $SSH_USER@$MACHINE $SSH_COMMAND";
682
683 # The way to copy a file to the target
684 # (default scp $SRC_FILE $SSH_USER@$MACHINE:$DST_FILE)
685 # The variables SSH_USER, MACHINE, SRC_FILE and DST_FILE are defined.
686 #SCP_TO_TARGET = scp $SRC_FILE $SSH_USER@$MACHINE:$DST_FILE
687
688 # The nice way to reboot the target
689 # (default ssh $SSH_USER@$MACHINE reboot)
690 # The variables SSH_USER and MACHINE are defined.
691 #REBOOT = ssh $SSH_USER@$MACHINE reboot
692
693 # The way triple faults are detected is by testing the kernel
694 # banner. If the kernel banner for the kernel we are testing is
695 # found, and then later a kernel banner for another kernel version
696 # is found, it is considered that we encountered a triple fault,
697 # and there is no panic or callback, but simply a reboot.
698 # To disable this (because it did a false positive) set the following
699 # to 0.
700 # (default 1)
701 #DETECT_TRIPLE_FAULT = 0
702
703 #### Per test run options ####
704 # The following options are only allowed in TEST_START sections.
705 # They are ignored in the DEFAULTS sections.
706 #
707 # All of these are optional and undefined by default, although
708 #  some of these options are required for TEST_TYPE of patchcheck
709 #  and bisect.
710 #
711 #
712 # CHECKOUT = branch
713 #
714 #  If the BUILD_DIR is a git repository, then you can set this option
715 #  to checkout the given branch before running the TEST. If you
716 #  specify this for the first run, that branch will be used for
717 #  all preceding tests until a new CHECKOUT is set.
718 #
719 #
720 # TEST_NAME = name
721 #
722 #  If you want the test to have a name that is displayed in
723 #  the test result banner at the end of the test, then use this
724 #  option. This is useful to search for the RESULT keyword and
725 #  not have to translate a test number to a test in the config.
726 #
727 # For TEST_TYPE = patchcheck
728 #
729 #  This expects the BUILD_DIR to be a git repository, and
730 #  will checkout the PATCHCHECK_START commit.
731 #
732 #  The option BUILD_TYPE will be ignored.
733 #
734 #  The MIN_CONFIG will be used for all builds of the patchcheck. The build type
735 #  used for patchcheck is oldconfig.
736 #
737 #  PATCHCHECK_START is required and is the first patch to
738 #   test (the SHA1 of the commit). You may also specify anything
739 #   that git checkout allows (branch name, tage, HEAD~3).
740 #
741 #  PATCHCHECK_END is the last patch to check (default HEAD)
742 #
743 #  PATCHCHECK_TYPE is required and is the type of test to run:
744 #      build, boot, test.
745 #
746 #   Note, the build test will look for warnings, if a warning occurred
747 #     in a file that a commit touches, the build will fail, unless
748 #     IGNORE_WARNINGS is set for the given commit's sha1
749 #
750 #   IGNORE_WARNINGS can be used to disable the failure of patchcheck
751 #     on a particuler commit (SHA1). You can add more than one commit
752 #     by adding a list of SHA1s that are space delimited.
753 #
754 #   If BUILD_NOCLEAN is set, then make mrproper will not be run on
755 #   any of the builds, just like all other TEST_TYPE tests. But
756 #   what makes patchcheck different from the other tests, is if
757 #   BUILD_NOCLEAN is not set, only the first and last patch run
758 #   make mrproper. This helps speed up the test.
759 #
760 # Example:
761 #   TEST_START
762 #   TEST_TYPE = patchcheck
763 #   CHECKOUT = mybranch
764 #   PATCHCHECK_TYPE = boot
765 #   PATCHCHECK_START = 747e94ae3d1b4c9bf5380e569f614eb9040b79e7
766 #   PATCHCHECK_END = HEAD~2
767 #   IGNORE_WARNINGS = 42f9c6b69b54946ffc0515f57d01dc7f5c0e4712 0c17ca2c7187f431d8ffc79e81addc730f33d128
768 #
769 #
770 #
771 # For TEST_TYPE = bisect
772 #
773 #  You can specify a git bisect if the BUILD_DIR is a git repository.
774 #  The MIN_CONFIG will be used for all builds of the bisect. The build type
775 #  used for bisecting is oldconfig.
776 #
777 #  The option BUILD_TYPE will be ignored.
778 #
779 #  BISECT_TYPE is the type of test to perform:
780 #       build   - bad fails to build
781 #       boot    - bad builds but fails to boot
782 #       test    - bad boots but fails a test
783 #
784 # BISECT_GOOD is the commit (SHA1) to label as good (accepts all git good commit types)
785 # BISECT_BAD is the commit to label as bad (accepts all git bad commit types)
786 #
787 # The above three options are required for a bisect operation.
788 #
789 # BISECT_REPLAY = /path/to/replay/file (optional, default undefined)
790 #
791 #   If an operation failed in the bisect that was not expected to
792 #   fail. Then the test ends. The state of the BUILD_DIR will be
793 #   left off at where the failure occurred. You can examine the
794 #   reason for the failure, and perhaps even find a git commit
795 #   that would work to continue with. You can run:
796 #
797 #   git bisect log > /path/to/replay/file
798 #
799 #   The adding:
800 #
801 #    BISECT_REPLAY= /path/to/replay/file
802 #
803 #   And running the test again. The test will perform the initial
804 #    git bisect start, git bisect good, and git bisect bad, and
805 #    then it will run git bisect replay on this file, before
806 #    continuing with the bisect.
807 #
808 # BISECT_START = commit (optional, default undefined)
809 #
810 #   As with BISECT_REPLAY, if the test failed on a commit that
811 #   just happen to have a bad commit in the middle of the bisect,
812 #   and you need to skip it. If BISECT_START is defined, it
813 #   will checkout that commit after doing the initial git bisect start,
814 #   git bisect good, git bisect bad, and running the git bisect replay
815 #   if the BISECT_REPLAY is set.
816 #
817 # BISECT_SKIP = 1 (optional, default 0)
818 #
819 #   If BISECT_TYPE is set to test but the build fails, ktest will
820 #   simply fail the test and end their. You could use BISECT_REPLAY
821 #   and BISECT_START to resume after you found a new starting point,
822 #   or you could set BISECT_SKIP to 1. If BISECT_SKIP is set to 1,
823 #   when something other than the BISECT_TYPE fails, ktest.pl will
824 #   run "git bisect skip" and try again.
825 #
826 # BISECT_FILES = <path> (optional, default undefined)
827 #
828 #   To just run the git bisect on a specific path, set BISECT_FILES.
829 #   For example:
830 #
831 #     BISECT_FILES = arch/x86 kernel/time
832 #
833 #   Will run the bisect with "git bisect start -- arch/x86 kernel/time"
834 #
835 # BISECT_REVERSE = 1 (optional, default 0)
836 #
837 #   In those strange instances where it was broken forever
838 #   and you are trying to find where it started to work!
839 #   Set BISECT_GOOD to the commit that was last known to fail
840 #   Set BISECT_BAD to the commit that is known to start working.
841 #   With BISECT_REVERSE = 1, The test will consider failures as
842 #   good, and success as bad.
843 #
844 # BISECT_MANUAL = 1 (optional, default 0)
845 #
846 #   In case there's a problem with automating the bisect for
847 #   whatever reason. (Can't reboot, want to inspect each iteration)
848 #   Doing a BISECT_MANUAL will have the test wait for you to
849 #   tell it if the test passed or failed after each iteration.
850 #   This is basicall the same as running git bisect yourself
851 #   but ktest will rebuild and install the kernel for you.
852 #
853 # BISECT_CHECK = 1 (optional, default 0)
854 #
855 #   Just to be sure the good is good and bad is bad, setting
856 #   BISECT_CHECK to 1 will start the bisect by first checking
857 #   out BISECT_BAD and makes sure it fails, then it will check
858 #   out BISECT_GOOD and makes sure it succeeds before starting
859 #   the bisect (it works for BISECT_REVERSE too).
860 #
861 #   You can limit the test to just check BISECT_GOOD or
862 #   BISECT_BAD with BISECT_CHECK = good or
863 #   BISECT_CHECK = bad, respectively.
864 #
865 # Example:
866 #   TEST_START
867 #   TEST_TYPE = bisect
868 #   BISECT_GOOD = v2.6.36
869 #   BISECT_BAD = b5153163ed580e00c67bdfecb02b2e3843817b3e
870 #   BISECT_TYPE = build
871 #   MIN_CONFIG = /home/test/config-bisect
872 #
873 #
874 #
875 # For TEST_TYPE = config_bisect
876 #
877 #  In those cases that you have two different configs. One of them
878 #  work, the other does not, and you do not know what config causes
879 #  the problem.
880 #  The TEST_TYPE config_bisect will bisect the bad config looking for
881 #  what config causes the failure.
882 #
883 #  The way it works is this:
884 #
885 #   First it finds a config to work with. Since a different version, or
886 #   MIN_CONFIG may cause different dependecies, it must run through this
887 #   preparation.
888 #
889 #   Overwrites any config set in the bad config with a config set in
890 #   either the MIN_CONFIG or ADD_CONFIG. Thus, make sure these configs
891 #   are minimal and do not disable configs you want to test:
892 #   (ie.  # CONFIG_FOO is not set).
893 #
894 #   An oldconfig is run on the bad config and any new config that
895 #   appears will be added to the configs to test.
896 #
897 #   Finally, it generates a config with the above result and runs it
898 #   again through make oldconfig to produce a config that should be
899 #   satisfied by kconfig.
900 #
901 #   Then it starts the bisect.
902 #
903 #   The configs to test are cut in half. If all the configs in this
904 #   half depend on a config in the other half, then the other half
905 #   is tested instead. If no configs are enabled by either half, then
906 #   this means a circular dependency exists and the test fails.
907 #
908 #   A config is created with the test half, and the bisect test is run.
909 #
910 #   If the bisect succeeds, then all configs in the generated config
911 #   are removed from the configs to test and added to the configs that
912 #   will be enabled for all builds (they will be enabled, but not be part
913 #   of the configs to examine).
914 #
915 #   If the bisect fails, then all test configs that were not enabled by
916 #   the config file are removed from the test. These configs will not
917 #   be enabled in future tests. Since current config failed, we consider
918 #   this to be a subset of the config that we started with.
919 #
920 #   When we are down to one config, it is considered the bad config.
921 #
922 #   Note, the config chosen may not be the true bad config. Due to
923 #   dependencies and selections of the kbuild system, mulitple
924 #   configs may be needed to cause a failure. If you disable the
925 #   config that was found and restart the test, if the test fails
926 #   again, it is recommended to rerun the config_bisect with a new
927 #   bad config without the found config enabled.
928 #
929 #  The option BUILD_TYPE will be ignored.
930 #
931 #  CONFIG_BISECT_TYPE is the type of test to perform:
932 #       build   - bad fails to build
933 #       boot    - bad builds but fails to boot
934 #       test    - bad boots but fails a test
935 #
936 #  CONFIG_BISECT is the config that failed to boot
937 #
938 #  If BISECT_MANUAL is set, it will pause between iterations.
939 #  This is useful to use just ktest.pl just for the config bisect.
940 #  If you set it to build, it will run the bisect and you can
941 #  control what happens in between iterations. It will ask you if
942 #  the test succeeded or not and continue the config bisect.
943 #
944 # CONFIG_BISECT_GOOD (optional)
945 #  If you have a good config to start with, then you
946 #  can specify it with CONFIG_BISECT_GOOD. Otherwise
947 #  the MIN_CONFIG is the base.
948 #
949 # Example:
950 #   TEST_START
951 #   TEST_TYPE = config_bisect
952 #   CONFIG_BISECT_TYPE = build
953 #   CONFIG_BISECT = /home/test/config-bad
954 #   MIN_CONFIG = /home/test/config-min
955 #   BISECT_MANUAL = 1
956 #
957 #
958 #
959 # For TEST_TYPE = make_min_config
960 #
961 #  After doing a make localyesconfig, your kernel configuration may
962 #  not be the most useful minimum configuration. Having a true minimum
963 #  config that you can use against other configs is very useful if
964 #  someone else has a config that breaks on your code. By only forcing
965 #  those configurations that are truly required to boot your machine
966 #  will give you less of a chance that one of your set configurations
967 #  will make the bug go away. This will give you a better chance to
968 #  be able to reproduce the reported bug matching the broken config.
969 #
970 #  Note, this does take some time, and may require you to run the
971 #  test over night, or perhaps over the weekend. But it also allows
972 #  you to interrupt it, and gives you the current minimum config
973 #  that was found till that time.
974 #
975 #  Note, this test automatically assumes a BUILD_TYPE of oldconfig
976 #  and its test type acts like boot.
977 #  TODO: add a test version that makes the config do more than just
978 #   boot, like having network access.
979 #
980 #  To save time, the test does not just grab any option and test
981 #  it. The Kconfig files are examined to determine the dependencies
982 #  of the configs. If a config is chosen that depends on another
983 #  config, that config will be checked first. By checking the
984 #  parents first, we can eliminate whole groups of configs that
985 #  may have been enabled.
986 #
987 #  For example, if a USB device config is chosen and depends on CONFIG_USB,
988 #  the CONFIG_USB will be tested before the device. If CONFIG_USB is
989 #  found not to be needed, it, as well as all configs that depend on
990 #  it, will be disabled and removed from the current min_config.
991 #
992 #  OUTPUT_MIN_CONFIG is the path and filename of the file that will
993 #   be created from the MIN_CONFIG. If you interrupt the test, set
994 #   this file as your new min config, and use it to continue the test.
995 #   This file does not need to exist on start of test.
996 #   This file is not created until a config is found that can be removed.
997 #   If this file exists, you will be prompted if you want to use it
998 #   as the min_config (overriding MIN_CONFIG) if START_MIN_CONFIG
999 #   is not defined.
1000 #   (required field)
1001 #
1002 #  START_MIN_CONFIG is the config to use to start the test with.
1003 #   you can set this as the same OUTPUT_MIN_CONFIG, but if you do
1004 #   the OUTPUT_MIN_CONFIG file must exist.
1005 #   (default MIN_CONFIG)
1006 #
1007 #  IGNORE_CONFIG is used to specify a config file that has configs that
1008 #   you already know must be set. Configs are written here that have
1009 #   been tested and proved to be required. It is best to define this
1010 #   file if you intend on interrupting the test and running it where
1011 #   it left off. New configs that it finds will be written to this file
1012 #   and will not be tested again in later runs.
1013 #   (optional)
1014 #
1015 # Example:
1016 #
1017 #  TEST_TYPE = make_min_config
1018 #  OUTPUT_MIN_CONFIG = /path/to/config-new-min
1019 #  START_MIN_CONFIG = /path/to/config-min
1020 #  IGNORE_CONFIG = /path/to/config-tested
1021 #